he weighed his life in his mind, and found that “The years to come He seems very sure of his thoughts and expresses his indifference towards those nations that are fighting. He seems very sure of his thoughts and expresses his indifference towards those nations that are fighting. He knows he will die in battle, and yet he's not sweatin' it. It will be up to you to choose a poem that deals with the same theme. The speaker argues that the outcome of the war is ultimately meaningless for his small community in western Ireland, and that he feels no … “An Irish Airman Foresees His Death” was written by the Irish poet W.B. Read about our approach to external linking. A traditional, and rather breezy and superficial, analysis of ‘An Irish Airman Foresees His Death’ might go something like this: an Irish pilot fighting for Britain in the First World War predicts that he will die in that war, but he feels no sense of patriotic duty towards Britain, the country he fights for. This short sixteen-line poem has a very simple structure: The poem, which, like flying, emphasizes balance, kind of tragic arithmetic is the neatly balanced structure of the Anthem for Doomed Youth by Wilfred Owen - CCEA, Requiem for the Croppies by Seamus Heaney - CCEA, An Irish Airman Foresees His Death - CCEA, Home Economics: Food and Nutrition (CCEA). An Irish Airman Forsees His Death by William Butler Yeats deals with the futility of war. the basic ABAB scheme utilizing different rhymes. towards the war. You should include relevant contextual material. Well, it's pretty much a certainty for the speaker of this poem. These phrases refer to those who start wars and call upon citizens to fight and defend their countries. The following is an example of the type of question you will get. He is above the "public men" and "cheering crowds". seemed waste of breath, / A waste of breath the years behind.”. It contrasts with the otherwise balanced language of the poem. of delight” drove him to “this tumult in the clouds.” He says that He says that he did not I know that I shall meet my fate Somewhere among the clouds above; Those that I fight I do not hate Those that I guard I do not love; My country is Kiltartan Cross, My countrymen Kiltartan’s poor, No likely end could bring them loss Or leave them happier than before. Summary “An Irish Airman foresees his Death” Summary The speaker, an Irish airman fighting in World War I, declares that he knows he will die fighting among the clouds. He asserts that "No likely end could bring them loss / Or leave them happier than before." lines metered in iambic tetrameter, and four grouped “quatrains” In this poem by W B Yeats an Irish airman weighs up his reasons for fighting the enemy during World War One. Millions of books are just a click away on BN.com and through our FREE NOOK reading apps. Here he conveys the sense that ‘his’ people will be largely unaffected by the outcome of the war he is taking part in. and rejects every possible factor he believes to be false: he does